Sunday, January 20, 2019

John Norment: William Tell

Jerome Wrinkle has contributed scans of another drawing by cartoonist John Norment (1911-1988). He dates this one to the late 1960s or 1970s, perhaps at the time Norment was working for Norcross greeting cards. Jerome believes it was not published, as there are no printer's markings. He speculates that it might even have been a New Yorker submission.

John Norment
Original cartoon art

Scan by Jerome Wrinkle

Summarizing the Norment cartoons from the two previous posts and this one, Jerome reports on the cartoonist's sequence of addresses:
The first cartoon has his address as East 22nd Street but he had moved to the Village by 1953 to West 10th Street. By the time he did the Archer cartoon he was in comfortable Westport, CT—the state that became haven for so many cartoonists.
Verso with John Norment's Westport address stamp
Scan by Jerome Wrinkle

Note:  Many thanks to Jerome Wrinkle for contributing the scans included in the last three posts and for providing a running commentary.


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Saturday, January 19, 2019

John Norment: The Compleat Angler

Contributor Jerome Wrinkle has gone all out to provide us with his favorite gag cartoon on the subject of fishing. The drawing is by John Norment (1911-1988) and it was published in the New York Times Book Review, hence its literary angle. Jerome notes that the verso contains an accounting stamp from the Editorial Auditing Department which documents that Norment was paid $50 for his efforts on Saturday, January 3, 1953, "...so I suspect it appeared prior to that."

John Norment
Original art
New York Times Book Review, c. January 1953

Scan by Jerome Wrinkle



Verso
Artist John Norment was paid $50 on Saturday, January 3, 1953
Scan by Jerome Wrinkle


Note:
  I thank Jerome Wrinkle for providing the above images. This is Jerome's fifth contribution to the blog, his deepest yet, and there's more on the way tomorrow.

To the best of my knowledge, examples of original cartoon art that appeared weekly in the New York Times Book Review back in the 1950s are quite rare today. I'd like to hear from anyone who possesses such art. I'd also like to hear from anyone with a copy of the Book Review in which this cartoon appeared.



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Friday, January 18, 2019

John Norment: Grinning and Bearing It

Contributor Jerome Wrinkle has scanned the original art by cartoonist John Norment (1911-1988) that appeared in an issue of the New York Times Book Review nearly seven decades ago. The cartoon purports to explain the unusual demographics of a bestselling book. The artist was paid $50 for his work on February 17, 1951. Jerome writes:
The Book Review was an exclusive sale—if I remember correctly, they only published one cartoon in each issue, on the second page. Lots of competition for that spot.
"In spite of the fact that very few people are buying it, it's still a best seller."
John Norment
Original art
The New York Times Book Review, c. February 1951

Scan by Jerome Wrinkle



Verso
Stamp indicates that artist John Norment was paid $50 on Saturday, February 17, 1951
Scan by Jerome Wrinkle

Note:  My thanks to Jerome Wrinkle for kindly contributing the scans in today's post. More is on the way.

I am intrigued to learn that the widely-read Times Book Review published a weekly cartoon for years. Does anyone today possess an archive of these? Please get in touch. I am particularly keen to see the issue in which this cartoon appeared.


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John Norment

Jerome Wrinkle

Bears

Books

Bookstores

The New York Times Book Review


Attempted Bloggery's Bookish Index

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Thursday, January 17, 2019

Heinrich Kley: Grinning and Bearing It

The spring 2007 auction at Illustration House included a watercolor titled Bear Family Relaxing. We are told it's a satire. Satire, one would think, should be recognizable without having to have it labeled as such. To me it seems more anthropomorphic than satirical. In other words, it doesn't so much mock human behavior as elevate bears to human status.

Heinrich Kley
Satire:  Bear Family Relaxing
Illustration House, June 2, 2007




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Wednesday, January 16, 2019

License Plate for an Emotive Thespian?

Is the pronunciation indicated by this vanity license plate a tad overdemonstrative or does it merely signify a love of great entertainment? The car was spotted just last week in New York, making me want to break into song. But for some reason I didn't.
"THE8TRE"
New York License Plate


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The Cartoon Collections Caption Contest #6

Here are my entries in the Cartoon Collections Caption Contest #6. The drawing is by Lila Ash.

"In lieu of a tip, could I borrow some batteries?"
"My arms hurt. Could I borrow a bicycle?"
"Next time I'm going with Velcro shoelaces"
"It's the latest in anti-drone technology."
"I'm being replaced by a kid on a bicycle."
"I've been neglecting my quads."
"The corner deli has been acquired by Amazon."


Tuesday, January 15, 2019

The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons: Barnes & Noble Exclusive Edition

The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons (2018) is published in a regular $100 edition (currently discounted to $50 on Amazon) and an $800 deluxe edition with three prints signed respectively by Roz Chast, Bruce Eric Kaplan, and editor Bob Mankoff (currently discounted to $560.48 on Amazon). There is also a lesser-known Barnes & Noble Exclusive Edition which has made its way onto Amazon at $199.99—twice the standard edition's undiscounted price—plus $48.59 for non-Prime shipping. So what does this Exclusive Edition contain that's not a part of the standard edition? Why, according to the listing on Amazon there's a "bonus frameable print." That's it. But for all that extra money one would think that's got to be quite a print!


The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons:  A Semi-Serious A-to-Z Archive
Barnes & Noble Exclusive Edition
Amazon Listing Retrieved January 11, 2019

But wait! It turns out this listing is merely one Amazon bookseller's exorbitant price. Far away from Amazon, the Barnes & Noble website prices their exclusive edition competitively:

This looks to be the exclusive print: a bookstore cartoon by Peter Steiner.








The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons:  A Semi-Serious A-to-Z Archive
Barnes & Noble Exclusive Edition
Barnes & Noble Listing Retrieved January 14, 2019



Note:  Readers are encouraged to send confirmatory scans or photos of this B&N exclusive edition print, or better still of the three signed prints in the more expensive deluxe edition. Buyers shouldn't have to purchase these prints sight unseen. Readers wishing to purchase the Barnes & Noble Exclusive Edition are advised to avoid the Amazon seller currently offering it and to purchase it instead from Barnes & Noble. Of course, of course!



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Monday, January 14, 2019

My Entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #646

Take some air and enjoy my entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #646 for January 14, 2108. The drawing is by Joe Dator.
"Sandra, forget all this and run
away with me to Aspen."



These captions didn't land well:
"Did I ever tell you about the agony of defeat?"
"So far, so good."

"I'm really not into all this fun in the sun."
"Have you considered winter sports?"




Note:  Last week cartoonist Kim Warp gave us a close encounter with the Yeti. My caption was, quite frankly, abominable. Journey up the mountain to Contest #645.


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Sunday, January 13, 2019

Blog Post No. 2800: George Price's House Rules

Welcome to the clubhouse! Original New Yorker art from 1935 by George Price was sold on eBay two years ago and they're still going over the club rules. Let's have a look:

"But there must be some sort of house rule."
George Price
Original art

The New Yorker, October 5, 1935, page 20

"But there must be some sort of house rule."
George Price
Original art
The New Yorker, October 5, 1935, page 20

Detail

George Price's signature

Large detail

The typed caption in the matte window lacks the requisite emphasis on the word some and carries an incorrect exclamation point.

Large detail

The slightly-incorrect typewritten caption again

The framed and matted art

Detail of clubmen

Detail of the rule book

The framed and matted art

George Price
eBay Listing Ended December 31, 2016

George Price
eBay Item Description

George Price
eBay Bid History
Two bidders duke it out, raising the price by just a single $2.50 bid increment.



"But there must be some sort of house rule."
George Price
The New Yorker, October 5, 1935, page 20

"But there must be some sort of house rule."
George Price
Original art
The New Yorker, October 5, 1935, page 20

"But there must be some sort of house rule."
George Price
The New Yorker,
October 5, 1935, page 20


Cartoons by Richard Decker and George Price

The eBay seller mistakenly thought this early piece dated from the 1950s or 1960s. Actually, this 1935 drawing was exhibited at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1940 as documented in Life magazine. The show featured more than 700 works of cartoon art by 39 artists and at the time was the largest museum show of its type. 
"Flowering of American Cartoon Art is Hailed at Rhode Island Museum"
George Price
Life magazine, April 22, 1940, page 74




























Note:
  Does anyone keep track of the largest cartoon exhibitions? This 1940 RISD exhibition might still rank as one of the bigger showings of original cartoon art, but I couldn't really say. Still, I'd like to know more about it, other than what's already in Life. Anyone with access to a catalogue, exhibition list, or photographs of the show please get in touch.



The Attempted Bloggery Centennial Posts
 ðŸ’¯

Blog Post No. 100
Blog Post No. 200:  A Shaggy Dog Story

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02800

Saturday, January 12, 2019

George Price: Asking Directions at the 1964 World's Fair

A family stops to ask directions at the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair. The original art to this vintage George Price New Yorker cartoon was sold at Illustration House back in 2004. The iconic observation towers to the New York State Pavilion are visible in the background, the tallest structures. These towers still stand today, although their external elevators are long gone and the Pavilion is overall in a dilapidated state. Price's family, it is to be hoped, found their way to their destination long ago.
"Which way to the House of Good Taste, Mac?"
George Price
Original art
The New Yorker, July 11, 1964, page 31
The World of George Price:  A 55-Year Retrospective. New York:  Beaufort, 1988

Blouin Art Sales Index



http://www.artnet.com/artists/george-price/people-asking-directions-at-1964-world-s-fair-5u5XnsZp5Zn6C9JkwNoVYQ2

http://www.findartinfo.com/search/listprices.asp?keyword=3078&name=George%20Price

"Which way to the House of Good Taste, Mac?"
George Price
Original art
The New Yorker, July 11, 1964, page 31
The World of George Price:  A 55-Year Retrospective. New York:  Beaufort, 1988


https://archives.newyorker.com/?i=1964-07-11#folio=030



The World of George Price:  A 55-Year Retrospective. New York:  Beaufort, 1988.


Note:  According to Wikipedia, the New York State Pavilion at the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair was designed by architects Philip Johnson and Richard Foster with structural engineer Lev Zetlin.


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