Monday, December 11, 2017

My Entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #596

As ye sow, so shall ye reap my entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #596 for December 11, 2017. The drawing is by Frank Cotham.

"I prefer mine dark."


The caption not taken:
"Yes, I will take one for the, er, road."




Note:  Last week cartoonist Drew Dernavich's snowman went on a shopping spree. My caption got a frosty reception. Let's wrap up Contest #595.

See what cartoonist Frank Cotham already has reaped on this blog here.

Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.

02395

Sunday, December 10, 2017

An Honest Heart by John Held, Jr.


We know that a William T. Todd of Oxford Mills, Ottawa died in September of 1931 and that a William T. Todd of Pittsburgh was about 70 at that time. Neither is a known artist or would seem to be credible as the creator of An Honest Heart, Or, Hard at Work Really Wishing You A Merry Christmas which is adorned with the year 1931—possibly the coming New Year—and which looks for all the world like the work of John Held, Jr. The artwork has printer's marks on it and was likely published as a Christmas card. Held was known to sign his "engravings"with great wit, but why he specifically would choose to sign one "Done by William T. Todd, who scorns empty words" is not at all clear. The paper has extensive pencil underlining—see the candle flame and the table, etc.—an indication that he drew directly with ink on this imitation woodblock print.

An Honest Heart
Or, Hard at Work Really Wishing You A Merry Christmas, c. 1930
John Held, Jr. 
"Done by William T. Todd, who scorns empty words"

William T. Todd (John Held, Jr.?)
eBay Item Description as of June 15, 2017
Sold for $25 on June 17, 2017

William T. Todd (John Held, Jr.?)
eBay Item Description



An Honest Heart
Or, Hard at Work Really Wishing You A Merry Christmas, c. 1930
John Held, Jr. 
"Done by William T. Todd, who scorns empty words"


Note:  What's the connection to William T. Todd? Readers are invited to speculate. John Held, Jr., usually signed his own name to his art. My wishbone wish would be for readers to share scans or photographs of his original or published art, including retro designs for Christmas cards. Information about this particular piece's lost publication history would be welcome as well.


Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

John Held, Jr.


Christmas

Attempted Bloggery's Hearty Index

Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.

02394

Saturday, December 9, 2017

Christmas Greetings from John Held, Jr.


John Held, Jr., was hands-down the most popular illustrator of the 1920s. His flappers and their companions seemed to effortlessly embody the Jazz Age. But he also created a line of remarkable linoleum block prints masquerading as late 19th century "engravings." They are endlessly nostalgic for the magic of a lost age every bit as much as his flapper drawings are expressive of his own moment. Three vintage Christmas cards in this charmingly old-fashioned style surfaced recently on eBay. They romanticize the joys of Christmas shopping in a bygone era.




John Held, Jr.
eBay Listing as of June 15, 2017
John Held, Jr.
eBay Item Description









Note:  John Held, Jr., was a formidable talent whether celebrating the Roaring Twenties or the Gay Nineties. Readers with examples of his unflappable flappers or topping top hatters are invited to send scans or photographs this way.


Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

John Held, Jr.


Christmas

Attempted Bloggery's Humbug Index

Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.

02393

Friday, December 8, 2017

Otto Soglow: 1974 Reuben Awards Dinner Program


What should we make of Otto Soglow's program cover for the National Cartoonists Society 1974 Reuben Awards Dinner? The dinner was held on April 22, 1974, with the program cover design capped by the arc of a baseball, reminding us that the new baseball season is underway. The illustration seems both lighthearted and surreal, part disembodied magic act and part lurid sideshow, with the coveted Reuben award depicted as a bearded bathing beauty being offered to a faceless—at least until the winner is announced—tuxedoed recipient. And the winner is...

Otto Soglow
The Cartoonist, 1974



Note:  My thanks once again to Stephen Kroninger for providing Attempted Bloggery with this scarce Soglow scan.

Otto Soglow had a uniquely economic style. I'd be happy to present more scans or photographs of his original art—hint, hint. Images of published rarities such as this NCS cover are also welcome.


Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives

Otto Soglow

Stephen Kroninger

Attempted Bloggery's Award-Shunning Index

Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.


02391

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Dutch Treat Club Total Offense 1941



Yesterday, December 7, 1941—a date which will live in infamy—the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.
—President Franklin D. Roosevelt

Speaking of infamy on this Pearl Harbor Day, let's take a long look at the artistic selections from the 1941 yearbook of The Dutch Treat Club! It's very timely theme is Dutch Treat Club Total Offense 1941 and surely it lives up to its name. The club's members do what they do every year, privately producing a volume of ribald humor that was too racy for general consumption and staging a one-off public performance—this year with George M. Cohan—that was probably very entertaining and still racy. War was clearly in the offing here. Everyone must have sensed that, even before Pearl Harbor.


Dutch Treat Club Total Offense 1941

Endpaper

Title Page













Aviation Terms
Frank Godwin


Wait for it... 
Memories
Tony Sarg
Leave it to the puppeteer! 
Memories
Tony Sarg









Happy Landing                                             
Dean Cornwell                                             










A pop-up by Tony Sarg:
Tony Sarg

Tony Sarg

Offense Terms
Otto Soglow




Peace—It's Wonderful!
James Montgomery Flagg

At Ease

"The Pursuit of Sappiness"
The 1941 Dutch Treat Club Show


John E. Sheridan







Russell Patterson



The following information has not been independently verified: 

The actual press run was probably 1,250.


Note: This time Stephen Kroninger has really outdone himself, photographing all the visually-compelling pages of the 1941 Dutch Treat Club yearbook. Once again, Stephen, I thank you.


Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives

The Dutch Treat Club

Stephen Kroninger

Attempted Bloggery's Infamous Index

Attempted Bloggery supports net neutrality.

02391