Monday, July 16, 2018

My Entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #623

Let's see if my entry in The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #623 for July 9, 2018 will fly. The drawing is by Joe Dator.

"The park doesn't allow them, period."



Note:  Last time around, cartoonist P. C. Vey fired up the barbecue in a subway car. My caption was underdone. Grab a paper plate and head for Contest #622.

Let's go fly a kite! And check out my previous posts on Joe Dator.

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Sunday, July 15, 2018

Edward Koren: The Fund Industry Cleans House

An original color illustration by Edward Koren shows the mutual fund industry cleaning house. That FT up in the pediment may indicate that the art was created for the Financial Times. Of note, the illustration appears on the website of Riley Illustration, the agency that represents Mr. Koren.











Edward Koren
eBay Listing Ended April 6, 2018


Edward Koren
eBay Item Description




Note:  I don't know where this illustration was published. If you do, let's hear it!

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Saturday, July 14, 2018

Edward Koren: Princely Perk

"It's good to be the king."
—Mel Brooks
History of the World, Part 1 (1981)

Cartoonist Edward Koren shows us just one of the perks of being royal. This original New Yorker art from a decade ago was sold on eBay earlier this year.

"I just love hanging out in my favorite chair."
Edward Koren
Original art
The New Yorker, November 17, 2008, page 53

Luise Ross Gallery label

Edward Koren's signature

Detail

Detail

Detail

Detail

Detail

Edward Koren
eBay Listing Ended March 8, 2018


Edward Koren
eBay Item Description

Edward Koren
eBay Bid History
One bid at the auction's close

"I just love hanging out in my favorite chair."
Edward Koren
The New Yorker, November 17, 2008, page 53

"I just love hanging out in my favorite chair."
Edward Koren
Original art
The New Yorker, November 17, 2008, page 53


Drawing by Edward Koren

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Friday, July 13, 2018

Edward Koren: Age Appropriate?

Who among us hasn't commented on a particular couple's age difference? New Yorker cartoonist Edward Koren does the math:

"How appropriate is that—she's a hundred and twenty years his junior."
Edward Koren
Original art
The New Yorker, September 3, 2012, page 40

Detail

Edward Koren's signature

Detail

"How appropriate is that—she's a hundred and twenty years his junior."
Edward Koren
Original art
The New Yorker, September 3, 2012, page 40

Luise Ross Gallery label




Edward Koren
eBay Listing Ended March 8, 2018


Edward Koren
Item Description

Edward Koren
eBay Bid History

Two bidders




"How appropriate is that—she's a hundred and twenty years his junior."
Edward Koren
The New Yorker, September 3, 2012, page 40
  

"How appropriate is that—she's a hundred and twenty years his junior."
Edward Koren

Original art
The New Yorker, September 3, 2012, page 40

Drawing by Edward Koren



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Thursday, July 12, 2018

Helen E. Hokinson: Dachshunds at White Sulphur Springs

During the World Wars, dachshunds were caught up in America's anti-German fervor and they became known by the alternate name "liberty hounds." In the postwar era, though, the German dogs could go back to being German again. That seems to be the basic message of a work of original cartoon art by Helen E. Hokinson published in 1947 that was unsuccessfully offered for sale in 2009 at Dargate Auction Galleries of Pittsburgh where it was given a presale estimate of $600 to $900, framed. It was described noncommittally by the auction house as "most likely an original illustration for the New Yorker Magazine." It's actually a freestanding published cartoon and not a story illustration, but we'll let that pass.

The auction listing also notes that it is "titled in pencil (probably by James Reid Parker)." Well, James Reid Parker was indeed the gag writer who collaborated so often and so brilliantly with Hokinson, but that fact certainly doesn't mean that he physically pencilled the captions onto the paper. Anyway, the auction estimate was subsequently lowered to $300 to $500 in 2010 at which time it sold for the low estimate. One final note: the handwritten caption has been altered slightly by the editors for publication, adding the dog name Waldina as a femininely-Teutonic counterweight to the overbearing name of the male dog.

"Why, you remember Baron von Meinhardt-Stellwitz! You met him at White Sulphur."
Helen E. Hokinson
Original art
Published as "Why, Waldina, you remember Baron von Meinhardt-Stellwitz! You met him at White Sulphur."
The New Yorker,
May 3, 1947, page 30

Helen E. Hokinson
Dargate Auction Galleries
August 9, 2009


Helen E. Hokinson
Dargate Auction Galleries
May 14, 2010

"Most likely an original illustration for the New Yorker Magazine."
Dargate Auction Galleries Item Description


"Why, Waldina, you remember Baron von Meinhardt-Stellwitz! You met him at White Sulphur."
Helen E. Hokinson
The New Yorker, May 3, 1947, page 30

"Why, you remember Baron von Meinhardt-Stellwitz! You met him at White Sulphur."
Helen E. Hokinson
Original art
Published as "Why, Waldina, you remember Baron von Meinhardt-Stellwitz! You met him at White Sulphur."
The New Yorker,
May 3, 1947, page 30

Cartoons by Helen E. Hokinson and Claude Smith


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