Tuesday, December 6, 2016

The Best American Comics 2016 Signed by Five Contributors

I would have loved to attend the book launch of The Best American Comics 2016 on October 5 at the Strand Bookstore but somehow I didn't have the time. Regretfully, I fell back on the old standby of placing a book order online instead. The book is signed by series editor Bill Kartalopoulos, guest editor Roz Chast, and contributors Liana Finck, Char Esme, and Anne Emond. Of course, it isn't personalized, but it's still a great copy of the book.

The Best American Comics 2016
Cover by Marc Bell

The Best American Comics 2016Signed by series editor Bill Kartalopoulos, guest editor Roz Chast,
Char Esme, Anne Emond, and Liana Finck

The Event

The Pre-Order Form


Here's the event I missed:
The Best American Comics 2016
Strand Bookstore



Note:  If you have a copy of this book with a different combination of signers or perhaps any edition of The Best American Comics with an original drawing by a contributor, please forward a crisp scan or photo  to the blog management.

Bill Kartalopoulos, Marc Bell, Anne Emond, and Char Esme are new to the blog today. Don't worry—the index has been updated.


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Roz Chast

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Monday, December 5, 2016

My Entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #548

I sure hope my license to write captions doesn't get suspended. In the meantime, here is my entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #548 for December 5, 2016. The drawing is by Tom Cheney.
"Do you have any idea how fast you were texting?"



Note:  Last week cartoonist Frank Cotham had us once again crawling through the desert. My caption couldn't keep up. Follow the leader to Contest #547.

Tom Cheney's blog posts here often go under the radar.

02036

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Christmas at the New Yorker Signed by John Updike

John Updike (1932-2009) wrote the foreword to Christmas at The New Yorker, a 2003 collection of art, prose, and poetry from the magazine. A copy signed by the celebrated author was offered at $120 on eBay earlier this year. It was sold in March.


Christmas at The New Yorker:  Stories, Poems, Humor, and Art
(New York:  Random House, 2003)
Cover art by Lonni Sue Johnson

Christmas at The New Yorker:  Stories, Poems, Humor, and Art
(New York:  Random House, 2003)
Signed by John Updike

eBay Listing Ended March 20, 2016

eBay Item Description




The book's festive cover art may be found on the cover of a 1985 issue of the magazine:
Lonni Sue Johnson, The New Yorker, December 16, 1985


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Signed books

02035

Saturday, December 3, 2016

James Stevenson: Taking Commercialism Out of Christmas

Edward S. Finkelstein, the fabled merchant and one-time president of Macy's New York, passed away in late May of 2014. He owned a large work of original New Yorker cartoon art by James Stevenson depicting a department store, almost certainly Macy's, at the height of the 1960 Christmas season. The artwork presents a spectacular overhead view of the bustling store while the boss offers  a younger and more idealistic staff member some sound career advice. The artwork was sold on eBay in December of 2015 for a price which, to be fair, does not in any way smart of the crass holiday commercialism it seems to suggest.

"Anderson, my boy, if you truly believe that commercialism should be taken out of Chrismas,
perhaps you ought to consider whether you really belong in the deparment store business."

James Stevenson, Original art
The New Yorker, December 10, 1960, page 55


"Anderson, my boy, if you truly believe that commercialism should be taken out of Chrismas,
perhaps you ought to consider whether you really belong in the deparment store business."

James Stevenson, Original art
The New Yorker, December 10, 1960, page 55

Detail

Caption

James Stevenson's signature

eBay Listing Ended December 18, 2015

Add caption

eBay Item Description





"Anderson, my boy, if you truly believe that commercialism should be taken out of Chrismas,
perhaps you ought to consider whether you really belong in the deparment store business."

James Stevenson, The New Yorker, December 10, 1960, page 55

"Anderson, my boy, if you truly believe that commercialism should be taken out of Chrismas,
perhaps you ought to consider whether you really belong in the deparment store business."

James Stevenson, The New Yorker, December 10, 1960, page 55

"Anderson, my boy, if you truly believe that commercialism should be taken out of Chrismas,
perhaps you ought to consider whether you really belong in the deparment store business."

James Stevenson, Original art
The New Yorker, December 10, 1960, page 55

Hmm. Does this 1990 photo of Edward Finkelstein from his obituary in the Times look at all familiar?
Edward S. Finkelstein at the flagship Manhattan store in 1990.
Credit Jim Wilson/The New York Times




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James Stevenson

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Friday, December 2, 2016

My Entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #547

Here is my entry in the New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest #547 for November 28, 2016. The drawing is by Frank Cotham.
"I'm a sucker for parades."


What was I thinking? I had a few other ideas...
"She's half a beat off." [Peter Arno]
"I feel as if we're part of something."
"I'd follow her anywhere."
"This is so much better than chasing that oasis!"
"I don't think she knows where she's going either."



I just wasn't meant to write this week's caption—or even to steal it. It's a good thing New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff was able to do much better in finding twelve semifinalists as informed by the crowdsourced rankings:



December 5, 2016 Update:  The Finalists




Note:  Last week cartoonist Michael Maslin took us to a desert island with a Busby Berkeley production number. Catch Contest #546.

Frank Cotham is never out of step.

Did you know I have a keyword link for cartoons about people crawling through the desert? I didn't.

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Thursday, December 1, 2016

George Sprott (1894-1975) with a Bookplate Signed by Seth

I don't really like signed bookplates. No matter how well done, they're evidence that a book's author never came into contact with the particular copy of the book you're looking at. Still, while browsing the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund's table at the 2016 MoCCA Arts Festival, I came across several copies of George Sprott (1894-1975), Seth's 2009 graphic novel. In each, the artist had signed a bookplate and provided a two-tone drawing of the title character. Who was I to say no? I needed a third copy of the oversized book anyway....

Seth, George Sprott (1894-1975), 2009

CBLDF bookplate with an original drawing of George Sprott signed Seth, 2011


CBLDF bookplate with an original drawing of George Sprott signed Seth, 2011



Note:  This concludes my series on the books I purchased in April at the MoCCA Arts Festival, still the closest thing to a comics convention I have attended. I was there only for about two hours, far less than the time it took to write the seven blog posts chronicling my take.

I have followed my own interests and inclinations, hunting down artists primarily over age fifty whose work appears once in a while in the New Yorker. This makes perfect sense for me, but it doesn't begin to hint at the youthful energy and vitality present throughout the venue. Each year's MoCCA Fest is full of talented, independent comic art practitioners already producing exciting art and destined to make many stunning contributions down the road.


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Seth

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Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Amadeo & Maladeo Signed by R. O. Blechman

I finally got to meet R. O. Blechman at the MoCCA Arts Festival in April. He signed a copy of his new book Amadeo & Maladeo and made a small drawing.

Book Signing at MoCCA Arts Festival 2016

R. O. Blechman, Amadeo & Maladeo:  A Musical Duet, 2016

Inscribed with a drawing of a bust "Cheers!/R. O. Blechman"



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Monday, November 28, 2016

Character Sketches in Ben Katchor's The Jew of New York

Yesterday I shared my copy of Ben Katchor's The Jew of New York (1998) signed by the artist with a small drawing of a folded ticket. It had been signed at the Alternative Press Expo in 2012 for the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund and I picked it up at this year's MoCCA Arts Festival in New York. Early in the evening, I received a note from reader and contributor David from Manhattan.

Seeing you're in a Ben K. frame of mind...
The 2000 is a first ed signed at the sorely missedN.Y. Book Fair on 5th Ave. The '99 is a 2nd printingfound on the often reliable Strand shelves years ago.Both are opposite the title page.

Drawing of Enoch Letushim inscribed
"To David,
from
Ben Katchor
9/29/00
NYC"

in Ben Katchor, The Jew of New York, 1998 first edition


 The character appears as a cut-out on the book's title page.
 
Enoch Letushim, second from right


Drawing of Mr. Marah signed
"Ben Katchor
2/29/99
The Strand"

in Ben Katchor, The Jew of New York, 1998, second printing


Cartoonist Ben Katchor and one his character's Mr. Marah, the importer of Jewish religious articles in NewYork City, 1825. BY ERIC LUSE/THE CHRONICLE


Mr. Marah


Prior to yesterday, cartoonist Larry Rippee posted perhaps the only original sketch from this book to appear online. Like the ticket, it was drawn at the Alternative Press Expo 2012 in San Francisco and it again features the character Enoch Letushim.
Drawing of Enoch Letushim inscribed "To Larry, from Ben Katchor Oct 14, 2012 SF, APE"

Note:  Thanks yet again to David from Manhattan for sharing more gems from his collection. There are now more original sketches from Ben Katchor's The Jew of New York available online than ever before.

Original sketches by Ben Katchor that he made in this book or other books are not that rare, but they are seldom posted online. If you'd like to share yours here, just get in touch.


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 quick links:

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Sunday, November 27, 2016

The Jew of New York Signed by Ben Katchor

At the MoCCA Arts Festival held in April of 2016, the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund (CBLDF) offered a copy of Ben Katchor's The Jew of New York (1999) signed by the artist with a rudimentary drawing of a folded canal boat ticket. The date and San Francisco location indicates the book was signed on the second day of the Alternative Press Expo in 2012. Has the CBLDF has been carrying it around to comics conventions for four years? I was happy to relieve them of this burden.

Ben Katchor, The Jew of New York, 1998, first paperback edition

Signed with a drawing of a folded canal boat ticket "Ben Katc[hor]/S.F./Oct 14, 2012"

Note:  This is Ben Katchor's first appearance on the blog.


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 quick links:

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Saturday, November 26, 2016

Funny Ladies Signed by Liza Donnelly

The cover of Liza Donnelly's Funny Ladies: The New Yorker's Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (2005) depicts a half dozen female cartoonists dressed as The New Yorker's mascot Eustace Tilley. This copy was purchased on the second day of the MoCCA Arts Festival 2016. It was spotted at the table of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund and contains a signed drawing of a funny lady who again happens to be dressed as Eustace Tilley.

Liza Donnelly
Funny Ladies: The New Yorker's Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons, 2005

Signed by Liza Donnelly with a drawing of a funny lady



Note:  Which is correct, women cartoonists or woman cartoonists? Or should we just avoid using a noun to modify another noun? We would probably never say men cartoonists or, even worse, man cartoonists, would we? We would call them male cartoonists. But what about boy cartoonists...?


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