Thursday, May 17, 2018

So this is Newark!—Leo Cullum and John Jonik Get Around

Luggage labels are those old-time status symbols that show where we've traveled and to what sort of sophistication we aspire. A greeting card by cartoonist Leo Cullum pokes fun at travelers' pretensions by displaying baggage labels from various cities in the State of—wait for it—New Jersey.


So this is Newark!
Leo Cullum
 Nobleworks greeting card


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Newark-Funny-Leo-Cullum-Congratulations-Card-Greeting-Card-by-Nobleworks-/281251662352?hash=item417be7ca10:g:qe0AAOxy63FS4XcG


Incidentally, cartoonist Leo Cullum was born in Newark. He worked as a commercial airline pilot who would have been quite familiar with what is today Newark Liberty International Airport.

With a premise similar to that of Mr. Cullum's greeting card, John Jonik's original New Yorker cartoon art makes a mockery of luggage labels from Newark, Jersey City, and Hoboken, but it also teases similar parts of the Tri-State Area which popular opinion deems less-than-swanky.

John Jonik
Original art
The New Yorker, 
April 12, 1976, page 123

John Jonik
The New Yorker, April 12, 1976, page 123

Drawing by John Jonik


The original art by John Jonik was sold at Swann Auction Galleries in 2016 along with two other drawings of his that were also published in the New Yorker.
John Jonik (3)
Swann Galleries
Illustration Art
September 29, 2016
Sale 2423, Lot 83
Hammer Price



John Jonik
Swann Galleries
Illustration Art
September 29, 2016
Sale 2423, Lot 83

With Buyer's Premium



Here then are John Jonik's two other New Yorker drawings from the 2016 Swann Galleries sale, not that you asked. The first, from 1993, makes mention of that crotchety political type, the disgruntled Republican. Today in 2018, with Republican's wielding effective control over the White House, both houses of Congress, and current appointments to the Judiciary, this raises a timely question with surprising possibilities: Are Republicans still disgruntled?
"How much longer, roughly, will you be introducing
me as 'a disgruntled Republican'?"

John Jonik
Original art
The New Yorker, April 12, 1993, page 83

"How much longer, roughly, will you be introducing me as 'a disgruntled Republican'?"
John Jonik
The New Yorker, April 12, 1993, page 83
Drawings by Charles Barsotti and John Jonik







The third and final cartooon asks whether there is anywhere we can't use a really good laugh?
"But, seriously...."
Published as "But, seriously..."
John Jonik


Original art

The New Yorker, May 13, 1996, page 60

"But, seriously..."
John Jonik
The New Yorker, May 13, 1996, page 60

Drawing by John Jonik


Note:  Attempted Bloggery seeks scans and photographs of original published and unpublished artwork by Leo Cullum (1942-2010), John Jonik (b. 1942) and other New Yorker artists. This post is the first appearance of cartoonist John Jonik here on the blog. So this is success?

I don't know the publication date for the Nobleworks greeting card by Leo Cullum. Anyone? I certainly don't pretend to know which of the two Newark luggage gags was published first and I don't intend the order in which I presented them to suggest it was Cullum's. I also don't mean to imply that either of these cartoonists might have copied the other.

My fussing over the caption change in the funeral cartoon is based on a real style issue. If an ellipsis comes at the end of a sentence or phrase, shouldn't it therefore take a fourth ellipsis point?

While we're talking style, which is the correct
punctuation: " ... 'a disgruntled Republican'?" or " ... 'a disgruntled Republican?'" Is it correct to have the question mark divide the closing quotation marks, or is that just a quirk of the New Yorker's style?

Do you see what I did there? Should one capitalize the word The in the middle of a sentence? Is it The New Yorker or the New Yorker? I usually choose not to capitalize, but I admit there are still times when I do.



Quick Links to the Attempted Bloggery Archives:

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